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29/10/2018

Tech&Society Conference: “Weapons of Math Destruction”

Espacio Fundación Telefónica
29/10/2018 @ 7:00 pm - 9:00 pm

 

Aspen Institute España and Fundación Telefónica celebrated a new conference on October 29th within the Tech & Society cicle with Cathy O’Neil, author of “Weapons of maths destruction: How Big Data Increases Inequality and Threatens Democracy”.

Big Data makes the difference in many different sectors, increasing companies’ competitiveness or improving their decisions making process. Insurance companies, banks (when granting loans) or human resources departments are example of daily usage of algorithms in pursuit of efficiency.  However, for Cathy O’Neil, the design of these formulas brings important questions to the table: Allow algorithms equal opportunities? Make sense under a democratic system?  Perpetuate inequalities? Big Data evaluates risks, checks our health, assigns profiles and highlights one candidate over others, but why are they not transparent? Are they under some kind of regulation? Welcome to the darkest side of Big Data.

Our guest to this new Tech&Society session, Cathy O’Neil, is a northamerican mathematician, author of mathbabe.com blogsite and author of some data science books, the last one, “Weapons of Math Destruction” was nominated for National Book Award 2016.

 

Cathy O’Neil

Cathy O’Neil earned a Ph.D. in math from Harvard, was a postdoc at the MIT math department, and a professor at Barnard College where she published a number of research papers in arithmetic algebraic geometry. She then switched over to the private sector, working as a quant for the hedge fund D.E. Shaw in the middle of the credit crisis, and then for RiskMetrics, a risk software company that assesses risk for the holdings of hedge funds and banks. She left finance in 2011 and started working as a data scientist in the New York start-up scene, building models that predicted people’s purchases and clicks.

She wrote Doing Data Science in 2013 and launched the Lede Program in Data Journalism at Columbia in 2014. She is a regular contributor to Bloomberg View and wrote the book Weapons of Math Destruction: how big data increases inequality and threatens democracy. She recently founded ORCAA, an algorithmic auditing company.

The conference was held in english and translated simultaneously.

 


Armas de Destrucción Matemática: Cómo el Big Data aumenta la desigualdad y amenaza la democracia

In colaboration with:

Capitan Swing negro

22/11/2018

Tech&Society Conference: Collective Intelligence and Democracy

Espacio Fundación Telefónica
22/11/2018 @ 7:00 pm - 9:00 pm


Collective Intelligence and Democracy
Thursday, November 22nd, 19:00pm
Espacio Fundación Telefónica Auditorium (Fuencarral 3, Madrid)

 

Aspen Institute España and Fundación Telefónica celebrated a new conference on November 22nd within the Tech & Society cicle about “Collective Intelligence and Democracy” with Beth Noveck, director at the Governance Lab (GovLab) and its MacArthur Research Network on Opening Governance. Previously, she served in the White House as the first United States Deputy Chief Technology Officer and director of the White House Open Government Initiative under President Obama.

After her presentation, Rocío Martínez-Sampere, Aspen España Fellow and director of Felipe González Foundation, moderated the event.

 

 

With rates of trust in government at all-time low, the legitimacy and effectiveness of traditional political institutions are called into question and there is a great demand for re-imagining how we govern. Digital technology and new ways of working enabled by technology are beginning to change the way public institutions make decisions and solve problems. The better governments at every level are turning to new tools to harness and amplify the brainpower of their citizens. From courts to legislatures, around the world, many creative projects are underway to tap collective intelligence and public know how. Blockchain and artificial intelligence are further helping to scale and accelerate the application of collective intelligence to governing.

In this session we explored the latest wave of democratic experiments and what is being learned from them. How we can measure their impact on institutions and individuals? What do they portend — both the positive potential and the risks — for the future design of democracy?

 

Beth Noveck
Beth Simone Noveck directs the Governance Lab (GovLab) and its MacArthur Research Network on Opening Governance. She is a Professor in Technology, Culture, and Society at New York University’s Tandon School of Engineering and a Fellow at NYU’s Institute for Public Knowledge. New Jersey governor Phil Murphy appointed her as the state’s first Chief Innovation Officer in 2018. Previously, Beth served in the White House as the first United States Deputy Chief Technology Officer and director of the White House Open Government Initiative under President Obama. UK Prime Minister David Cameron appointed her senior advisor for Open Government.

At the GovLab, she directs better governance programs, including work with public institutions on public engagement in lawmaking (CrowdLaw), expert-sourcing innovative solutions to hard problems (Smarter Crowdsourcing), co-creation between cities and citizens (City Challenges). She also coaches “public entrepreneurs.” working with passionate individuals to take their public interest projects from idea to implementation.

A graduate of Harvard University and Yale Law School, she is a member of the Scholars Council of the Library of Congress, the Center for Open Science, Open Contracting Partnership and the EPSRC Centre for the Mathematics of Precision Healthcare. Beth also serves on the International Advisory Board of the NHS Digital Academy and the Yankelovich Democracy Monitor as well as a member of the Inter-American Development Bank President’s Commission on Transparency and Corruption and the Global Future Council on Technology, Values and Policy for the World Economic Forum. She is a member of the Steering Committee for the Collective Intelligence Conferences and GIGAPP (Grupo de Investigación en Gobierno, Administracion y Politicas Publicas). She is co-editor of the Association for Computing Machinery’s Digital Government Research and Practice journal.

In 2018, Beth was awarded a Robert Schumann Fellowship at the European University Institute and a Richard von Weizsaecker Fellowship by the Robert Bosch Foundation. Beth was named one of the “World’s 100 Most Influential People in Digital Government 2018” by Apolitical. Previously, she was selected as one of the “Foreign Policy 100″ by Foreign Policy as well as one of the “100 Most Creative People in Business” by Fast Company and “Top Women in Technology” by Huffington Post.

Beth is the author of Smart Citizens, Smarter State: The Technologies of Expertise and the Future of Governing (Harvard Univ Press 2015) and Wiki Government: How Technology Can Make Government Better, Democracy Stronger and Citizens More Powerful (Brookings 2009) and co-editor of The State of Play: Law, Games and Virtual Worlds (NYU Press, 2005). Her next book, Public Entrepreneurship: Training the Next Generation of Public Leader and Problem Solver, will appear with Yale Press.

 

Rocío Martínez-Sampere
Rocío Martínez-Sampere is Director of Felipe González Foundation. She holds a Degree in Economics from Pompeu Fabra University, and a Master Degree in Economy and a Master Degree in Governance and Public Politics from the London School of Economics. Previosly, she worked as analyst at City and at Fabian Society, a foundation related to the Labour party, where she get involved. After that, she joined Rafael Campalans Foundation, where she is now member of the Board of Trustees. She also has been Cabinet Chief for Narcís Serra and advisor for Pasqual Maragall in Cataluña. She is involved in the Socialists’ Party of Catalonia (PSC) since 2003. In 2006 she was elected congresswoman for Barcelona in the Parliament, speaker on Economy and budgets. She took a step forward in her career presenting her candidacy for Barcelona mayor. When she losted the primaries, she resigned a week after the municipal elections in 2015. Rocío is Aspen España Fellow since 2017.

 

Recommended articles:

– Noveck, Beth Simone, Five Hacks For Digital Democracy. Nature 544, 287-289, April 20, 2017.
https://www.nature.com/news/five-hacks-for-digital-democracy-1.21849

– Adhikari, Narayan, Toward Open Governance. The Aspen Institute New Voices Fellowship (originally published in My República), July 31, 2018
http://newvoicesfellows.aspeninstitute.org/In-The-News/Details/0576/Toward-Open-Governance?_ga=2.201819345.1566036663.1542014086-44301258.1361349420

– Tyson, Laura, Foroohar, Rana, Lund, Susan and Castro, Daniel , Why technology, not goods, is the driver of globalization. The Aspen Ideas Festival, 2018. (Soundcloud)
https://www.aspenideas.org/session/why-technology-not-goods-driver-globalization

-White, Ben, Technology for an inclusion economy. The Aspen Institute, October 31, 2018.
https://www.aspeninstitute.org/blog-posts/technology-for-an-inclusive-economy/

– Bradley, Jennifer, The City Reinvented. Ideas, the magazine of The Aspen Institute, December 1, 2017.
https://www.aspeninstitute.org/longform/aspen-ideas-winter-2017/the-city-reinvented/

– Doctoroff, Dan, The Ultimate Startup: A City. Interview at CityLab Detroit 2018 with Jennifer Bradley, Executive Director, Center for Urban Innovation, The Aspen Institute.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4Kf9fH3myyI

– Ibargüen, Alberto, Culture Shift: How Tech is Changing Citizenship. Interview at CityLab Detroit 2018 with Jennifer Bradley, Executive Director, Center for Urban Innovation, The Aspen Institute.
https://www.aspeninstitute.org/videos/culture-shift-how-tech-is-changing-citizenship/

– Katz, Bruce, Speck, Jeff, Sadik-Khan, Janette, Reed, Kasim, Mathis, Sommer, Landrieu, Mitch, Imagining 2024: Urban America. The Aspen Ideas Festival 2014.
https://www.aspenideas.org/session/imagining-2024-urban-america?page=91

7/03/2019

Conference Tech & Society: “How To Be a Good Digital Parent”

Espacio Fundación Telefónica
7/03/2019 @ 7:00 pm - 9:00 pm

Aspen Institute España and Fundación Telefónica have celebrated a new session of the Tech & Society Program 2019 on “How To Be a Good Digital Parent” with Stephen Balkam, founder and director of Family Online Safety Institute (FOSI) and Noelia Amoedo, CEO of Mediamart Mobile, moderator of the debate with the assistants.

 


The digital environment arouses a logic concern among parents with sons and daughters of all ages. Overexposure of children to screens, not being mature enough to anticipate the dangers or understand the consequences, generate a multitude of questions: What guidelines should be followed by parents in the digital education of their children? What aspects should be paid more attention to? How to help establish a positive and enriching relationship between our children and digital technologies?

 

Biographies of the speakers

Stephen Balkam has had a wide range of leadership roles in the nonprofit sector in the both the US and UK for the past 30 years. He is the Founder and CEO of the Family Online Safety Institute (FOSI), an international, nonprofit organization headquartered in Washington, DC. FOSI’s mission is to create a “culture of responsibility,” in the online world to make the online world safer for kids and their families. Previously, Stephen was the Founder and CEO of the Internet Content Rating Association (ICRA), and served on the US Child Online Protection Commission (COPA); in 2001 he was named one of the Top 50 UK Movers and Shakers by Internet magazine. Stephen is a member of the Safety Advisory Board at Facebook as well as the social media app, Skout. For his efforts in online safety, Stephen was given the 1998 Carl Bertelsmann Prize in Gutersloh, Germany, for innovation and responsibility in the information society and was invited to the first and subsequent White House Internet Summits during the Clinton Administration. A native of Washington, DC, Stephen spent many years in the UK. He earned a BA, magna cum laude, in psychology from University College, Cardiff, Wales in 1977. He writes regularly for the Huffington Post, is a LinkedIn Influencer, has appeared on nationally syndicated TV and radio programs such as MSNBC, CNN, NPR and the BBC and has been interviewed by leading media outlets such as the Washington Post, New York Times and The Wall Street Journal. He has given presentations and spoken in17 countries on 4 continents.

 

Noelia Amoedo is currently the CEO of Mediasmart Mobile, a technology company in the field of mobile advertising. She is an expert in managing businesses based on mobile technologies, having worked in the industry since 2000. She has gained deep knowledge of the industry across the value chain thanks to her direct experience with multiple business models in more than a dozen international markets. Noelia has taken several executive roles in the past few years, including VP of marketing and business development for webOS in EMEA at Palm – HP’s subsidiary, VP of Mobile at the social network hi5, back when social networks were starting to succeed, and multiple senior positions with the mobile value added service provider Buongiorno, the last one of which was Managing Director of Buongiorno USA. Prior to her life on mobile, Noelia also worked at iPIN Transaction Systems in San Francisco back in 1999, where she first got acquainted with an internet based business. Noelia has a Bachelor’s Degree in Physics (major in optical communications) by Santiago de Compostela University, and a Master in Electrical Engineering by Stanford University, where she was a Fulbright Scholar.

 

Third edition of the Tech & Society Program

This program, co-organized with Fundación Telefónica, aims to establish a forum for reflection on the issues raised by advances in digital technology and its influence in areas as diverse as human relations, politics, education, the economy or medicine. In each session, an expert on all those areas exhibits his own point of view on how digital technology is influencing our lives.

Socrates Seminar

Real Maestranza de Ronda
8/03/2019 @ 1:30 pm - 10/03/2019 @ 1:00 pm

TECH & SOCIETY PROGRAM
Moderated by Stephen Balkam, Founder and CEO of the Family Online Safety Institute (FOSI)

Aspen Institute España celebrated on March, 8-10, 2019, it’s next annual edition of the Socrates Seminar. This Seminar is part of Tech&Society Program, organized in colaboration with Fundación Telefónica. Stephen Balkam, Founder and CEO of FOSI, was the moderator of the Seminar.

Following the lines set forth by The Aspen Institute in the US, the Socrates España Seminars provide a forum for emerging leaders (between the ages of 28 and 45) from various professions to convene and reflect over contemporary issues through expert-moderated dialogues. These seminars enable participants to explore current and pressing leadership challenges. Discussions are built around contemporary texts, and are led by expert moderators who engage and encourage participants to share their views. At the core of these Seminars is a remarkable group of emerging and recognized leaders including entrepreneurs, venture capitalists, representatives from the public sector and journalists, among others.

This program, co-organized with Fundación Telefónica, aims to establish a forum for reflection on the issues raised by advances in digital technology and its influence in areas as diverse as human relations, politics, education, the economy or medicine. Digital technology is radically changing almost everything we do, from the way we manage our business to how we educate the next generation or the way we coexist in a democratic society. What are the most important changes and technological trends and how can we prepare to face them? What are the specific ways in which technological change is improving our individual and collective lives? What is its impact on political participation? How does technological development affect the workforce, productivity or the perception of life and health?

Since its first edition in 2017, the Program incorporates a Socrates Seminar as part of its activities. In the first edition, the seminar was moderated by Connie Yowell, CEO of Collective Shift, and discussed “Change and opportunity: The future of work and learning”. The second edition of the Program, in 2018, incorporated a Socrates Seminar moderated by Leigh Hafrey, Professor of Ethics and Communication at the MIT Sloan School of Management, and titled “Brave New World: Humanity, Technology and the Future of Work”.

 

 Moderator’s Biography

Stephen Balkam has had a wide range of leadership roles in the nonprofit sector in the both the US and UK for the past 30 years. He is the Founder and CEO of the Family Online Safety Institute (FOSI), an international, nonprofit organization headquartered in Washington, DC. FOSI’s mission is to make the online world safer for kids and their families. FOSI convenes the top thinkers and practitioners in government, industry and the nonprofit sectors to collaborate and innovate and to create a “culture of responsibility” in the online world. Prior to FOSI, Stephen was the Founder and CEO of the Internet Content Rating Association (ICRA) and lead a team which developed the world’s leading content labeling system on the web. While with ICRA, Stephen served on the US Child Online Protection Commission (COPA) in 2000 and was named one of the Top 50 UK Movers and Shakers, Internet Magazine, 2001. In 1994, Stephen was named the first Executive Director of the Recreational Software Advisory Council (RSAC) which created a unique self-labeling system for computer games and then, in 1996, Stephen launched RSACi – a forerunner to the ICRA website labeling system. For his efforts in online safety, Stephen was given the 1998 Carl Bertelsmann Prize in Gutersloh, Germany, for innovation and responsibility in the Information Society and was invited to the first and subsequent White House Internet Summits during the Clinton Administration. Stephen’s other positions include the Executive Director of the National Stepfamily Association (UK); General Secretary of the Islington Voluntary Action Council; Executive Director of Camden Community Transport as well as management positions at the Institute of Contemporary Arts (London) and Inter-Action. Stephen’s first job was with Burroughs Machines (now Unisys) and he had a spell working for West Nally Ltd – a sports sponsorship PR Company. Stephen received a BA, magna cum laude, in Psychology from University College, Cardiff, Wales in 1977. A native of Washington, DC, Stephen spent many years in the UK and now has dual citizenship. He writes regularly for the Huffington Post, has appeared on nationally syndicated TV and radio programs such as MSNBC, CNN, NPR and the BBC and has been interviewed by leading newspapers such as the Washington Post, New York Times and The Wall Street Journal, radio and in the mainstream press. He has given presentations and spoken in 16 countries on 4 continents.

20/05/2019

Tech & Society: The future of Internet: a social contract for the Web

Espacio Fundación Telefónica
20/05/2019 @ 7:00 pm - 9:00 pm

Espacio Fundación Telefónica
Monday, May 20th 19:00h
The session will be held in Spanish

 

Aspen Institute España and Fundación Telefónica celebrate a new session of the Tech&Society Program 2019 on The future of Internet: a social contract for the web with José Manuel Alonso, Director of Strategy and Alliances at Web Foundation. Marta Peirano, is a writer, a journalist and the Deputy Director of the digital newspaper eldiario.es, will moderate the conference.

Descentralization, non-discrimination, collaborative design, or the universal service are some of the concepts over which the web was founded. They had a very clear objective: to make knowledge available to the whole society. Currently, while half of the world population do not have access to Internet, the other half put their privacy, security and fundamental rights at risk.

Within this session we will debate about the continuity of the values that underpinned the Web originally, what the Web is like nowadays and how to redesign it in the future. Could a social contract palliate the risks we are exposed to at the Web?

 

 

This event will be interpreted in Spanish Sign Language; held in Spanish and could be followed in social networks with #TechSociety. If you want to come, do not forget to book your ticket.

 

Biography of the lecturer

José Manuel (@josemalonso) serves as Director of Strategy and Partnerships at the Web Foundation, the organization established by World Wide Web inventor Sir Tim Berners-Lee to advance the open web as a public good and a basic right. In providing strategic direction for the Foundation, he benefits from his deep knowledge of the Web and of the organization itself, as its longest-serving team member. He joined in 2011 to lead the Open Data program, later becoming the Director of the Digital Citizenship program. José has extensive experience in the fields of Open Data, eGovernment and Web standards. He has held a number of leadership and advisory roles, working on projects at the local, regional, national and global levels, including the Open Government Partnership, the International Open Data Charter, Open Ownership, Open Contracting, the Open Data Research Network, and the Open Data Initiative in Spain. He has served on United Nations and European Commission expert panels as well as on the Nominating Committee at ICANN, the organisation dedicated to preserving the operational security and stability of the Internet. Prior to joining the Foundation, José held several positions at the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C), the Web standards-setting organisation, where he established and led the eGovernment Activity. He also launched the Spain country office. Originally a software engineer, José has worked as IT analyst, consultant and trainer, and even founded his own web startup back in 1997.

 

Biography of the moderator

Credits: Manu Bravo

Marta Peirano (@minipetiteis a writer and journalist and a long time advocate for citizen privacy, government transparency, digital security and community based infrastructure. She has been a member of multidisciplinar collective Elástico, codirector of COPYFIGHT festival and cofounder of CryptoParty Berlín, among others. She works as deputy director at Spanish national daily eldiario.es. Her most recent book is The Little Red Book of Online Activism, an essay about the impact of digital surveillance, with a foreword by Edward Snowden. Her TED talk about digital surveillance has been watched more than 2 million times. She is working on a book about digital feudalism and political manipulation online.

 

Recommended Links

Sarpong, Eleanor, “Half of the world’s people are still offline. How do we connect them as quickly as possible?”, Alliance for Affordable Internet, February 5, 2019

Mattey, Carol, “Next Generation Digital Infrastructure: Promoting Investment, Competition and Consumer Protection”, Chapter 1 Fractured responsibility in a digital age, p 1-5

“Building a Contract for the Web — Next Steps”, Web Foundation, January 30, 2019

Harrison, Dominique, “Civil Rights Violations in the Face of Technological Change”, Aspen Institute EEUU April 22, 2019

“New Technologies and the Global Goals”, Web Foundation, January 10, 2019

 

8/07/2019

Conference: Tech&Society “Internet Culture: Dark Age or Renaissance?”

Espacio Fundación Telefónica
8/07/2019 @ 7:00 pm - 9:00 pm

 

Aspen Institute España and Fundación Telefónica have celebrated last Monday July 8th, the fourth session of the Program Tech&Society 2019 with a debate on  Internet Culture: Dark Age or Renaissance?by William Powers, writer, journalist, technologist and the author of  Hamlet’s BlackBerry and María Santoyo,  who moderated the session.

 

In the last several decades, digital technologies have connected and transformed the world. Everything we do, from raising families to running businesses to governing huge societies, is being reshaped by the Internet and the countless platforms and applications that run on it. One of the less-discussed aspects of this sea-change is the tech revolution’s impact on the fabric that has defined and sustained human societies since the dawn of history: culture. Is the Internet giving birth to a brand new culture? Are existing cultures threatened by this new medium or are they discovering new ways to thrive on it? Do the great cultural shifts of the past offer useful lessons for building the cultures of the AI-mediated future?

 

Biography of the speaker

William Powers is a writer, journalist and technologist. A former Washington Post staff writer, he wrote Hamlet’s BlackBerry: Building a Good Life in the Digital Age, one of the first books to call attention to the human downsides of the digital age. A New York Times bestseller, it has been published in many countries and languages. The book launched him on a journey into the technology world and his current work at MIT. He grew up in Rhode Island and graduated from Harvard with a degree in history and literature. He did graduate study in Spain, then moved to Washington, DC, where he was a U.S. Senate aide working on foreign relations, intelligence and military affairs. Next he joined The Washington Post, initially as researcher for Bob Woodward in the investigative unit. As a Post staff writer, he covered business, media, politics and ideas. His writing has appeared in The Atlantic, The New York Times and many other publications. He created The New Republic’s first media column and is a two-time winner of the National Press Club’s Rowse Award for media criticism. He has given keynote talks at conferences such as South by Southwest and the Aspen Ideas Festival, as well as numerous universities and other organizations. He’s moderated conversations for the Aspen Institute’s Socrates program in Spain, Ukraine, Mexico, Colombia and Japan, as well as the U.S. He has been a media fellow at Harvard’s Shorenstein Center and a resident fellow at the MacDowell Colony. He studied the culture of reading in Japan on a fellowship from the Japan Society, and had a Rotary International graduate scholarship in Madrid. In 2014, he joined the MIT Media Lab as a research scientist and has spent the last five years working on projects to ensure that artificial intelligence reflects human values and enables social progress. Home is Massachusetts, where he lives with his wife, writer Martha Sherrill, and their son, Will.

 

Biography of the moderator

María Santoyo is a researcher, teacher and independent curator specialized in the history of photography and the analysis of the image. She has more than fifteen years of experience working for companies within the cultural sector, ten of these years managing cultural projects in their entirety. As an independent curator, Santoyo has developed around ten projects, including Houdini: the Laws of Amazement, Jules Verne: the Limits of the Imagination and Nikola Tesla: His is the Future, exhibitions that took place at the Telefónica Foundation in Madrid and other Spanish and Latin American venues between 2014 and 2017. She has coordinated around twenty exhibitions for international institutions and experts such as Aperture Foundation, Magnum Photos, Kathy Ryan (The New York Times Magazine), Mónica Allende (The Sunday Times Magazine) or Trisha Ziff. She is the author of four books on photography and has collaborated with essays to various collective publications. She has also been an advisor at international events such as Fotopres La Caixa and Descubrimientos PHotoEspaña. In 2015 she started a program of support for emerging visual artists whose projects start from criteria, gaze and creativity as a tool for social transformation. The program started with the photographer Carole Alfarah and her project on the civilian victims of the Syrian conflict. As a teacher she has worked for the Instituto Superior de Arte (Madrid), the Universidad Politécnica (Madrid), the Universidad Europea (Madrid), the Universidad Complutense (Madrid) and the NYU (Madrid). She is currently a lecturer for the International Contemporary Photography Master in the EFTI School in Madrid.

 

Recommended articles:

Balsa-Barreiro, Jose, Cebrián, Manuel, Ortega, Andrés,  Ortega, Por un Internet español con emoción, El País Tribuna, Januay 30, 2019.
https://elpais.com/elpais/2019/01/09/opinion/1547060159_516710.html

Harrison, Dominique, Civil Rights Violations in the Face of Technological Change, The Aspen Institute, April 22, 2019.
https://www.aspeninstitute.org/blog-posts/civil-rights-violations-in-the-face-of-technological-change/

Selinger, Evan, Clive, Thompson, The Efficiency Delusion, One Zero, April 1, 2019.
https://onezero.medium.com/the-efficiency-delusion-f6a97241e1e1

CityLab, Culture Shift: How Tech is Changing Citizenship, The Aspen Institute, October 28, 2018.
https://www.aspeninstitute.org/videos/culture-shift-how-tech-is-changing-citizenship/

MIT Media Lab, Better natures, MIT Media Lab, January 17, 2019.
https://medium.com/mit-media-lab/better-natures-mit-media-lab-6435f30692a0

15/10/2019

 

Tuesday, October 15th at 19:00h
Espacio Fundación Telefónica (Fuencarral  3, Madrid)

Aspen Institute España and Fundación Telefónica came together again to present a new session for the Program Tech&Society with a conference by Heli Tiirmaa-Klaar on Cyber-diplomacy: The Role of International Relations in Emerging Technologies.  Heli Tiirmaa-Klaar is Ambassador at Large for cyber-diplomacy at the Estonian Ministry of Foreign Affairs.  The session was moderated by Áurea Moltó, Sub-Director of Política Exterior and Director of politicaexterior.com.

Technological developments and achievements have become the backbone of modern societies and economy. With greater interdependence, societies stand face to face with the increasing threat of destabilising effects from cyberspace. In her public talk, Ambassador Tiirmaa-Klaar elaborated on the following emerging areas: increasing interconnectedness in the world led by Information and Telecommunication technologies, how to encourage responsible state behavior in cyberspace and what can the international community do to mitigate threats. The three elements of the talk focused on the policy, legal and technical aspects of cyberspace.

The event took place in English with a Spanish sign language translator (LSE). Simultaneous translation devices for Spanish-speakers were also provided.   Live streaming was available on Fundacíon Teléfonica´s web page, and on social media under the hashtag #TechSociety.  Thank you for joining us.

 

 

BIOGRAPHIES

HELI TIIRMAA-KLAAR (@HeliKlaar)
Heli Tiirmaa-Klaar is the Ambassador at Large for Cyber Diplomacy at the Estonian Ministry of Foreign Affairs. Up until fall 2018, she was as the Head of Cyber Policy Coordination at the European External Action Service where she has steered and coordinated the EU external relations on cyber issues since 2012. She has been working on cyber security since 2007 when she led the development of the Estonian Cyber Security Strategy. In 2008-2010 she coordinated the implementation of the Estonian strategy, managed the National Cyber Security Council and led the development of Estonia’s National Cyber System as well as the public-private partnerships for cyber security. In 2011, she was assigned to the NATO International Staff to develop the new NATO Cyber Defence Policy. In her earlier career, she has held various managerial positions at the Estonian Ministry of Defence and the Tallinn University. She was a Fulbright Scholar at the George Washington University and has published articlese in several academic journals throughout her career.

 

ÁUREA MOLTÓ (@aureamolto)
Áurea Moltó is Sub-Director of Política Exterior and Director of politicaexterior.com. She previously worked as journalist in Agencia EFE (the Spanish news agency) and as a documentalist in Grupo Santillana before joining Economía Exterior as a Deputy Managing Editor. She was also an Advisor to the Secretary of State of España Global in the Ministry of Foreign Affairs. She has a Communications degree from Universidad Complutense de Madrid, a Master in Publishing from Universidad de Salamanca and postgraduate studies in Contemporary Latin American Politics from Instituto Universitario Ortega y Gasset. In 2009 she was senior visiting fellow at The Inter-American Dialogue (Washington DC). Aurea is a regular contributor to Latin American Advisor, Ethic magazine and 5Continentes in Radio 5 (Spanish national broadcasting station). She is a member of the Spanish Leadership Network of the Rafael del Pino Foundation. Besides being passionate about international journalism, she actively advocates for the equal participation of women in international relations.

 

26/11/2019

Open Conference
November 26th, 19:00h
 Espacio Fundación Telefónica
Fuencarral 3, Madrid

Aspen Institute España and Fundación Telefónica came together again to present a new session for the Program Tech&Society with a conference by Jennifer Bradley on Smart Cities: How to use technology to make cities better for people.  Jennifer Bradley is the founding director of the Center for Urban Innovation  and co-author of  The Metropolitan Revolution (Brookings Press, 2013).  The session was moderated by Juan Lobato, alcalde de Soto del Real.

Technology offers extraordinary tools to improve the quality of life and service delivery in cities.  But, by themselves, new technologies will not deliver more equitable, opportunity-rich, and delightful places.  More city leaders are realizing that the idea of “smart cities” is too limited, and too driven by industry, to capture what residents want from new technology.  What comes after the “smart city,” and how are city governments trying to build and deliver it?  And how can urban residents be more involved in creating the technological infrastructure that shapes public space and the experience of urban life?

The event took place in English with a Spanish sign language translator (LSE). Simultaneous translation devices for Spanish-speakers were also provided.  You could follow the event via live streaming on Fundacíon Teléfonica´s web page, and on social media under the hashtag #TechSociety. Thank you for joining us.

 

 

BIOGRAPHIES

JENNIFER BRADLEY (@JBradley_DC)
Jennifer Bradley is the founding director of the Center for Urban Innovation and the co-author, with Bruce Katz, of The Metropolitan Revolution (Brookings Press, 2013).  At the Center for Urban Innovation, she has led projects on: how local-level regulations can help or hinder innovation and economic inclusion; how cities can prepare for the advent of autonomous vehicles; how inclusive innovation happens in businesses, philanthropies, local governments, and non-profits; and the challenges that women and people of color have in accessing capital.  Prior to joining the Aspen Institute, Jennifer was a fellow at the Brookings Institution Metropolitan Policy Program, where she worked on the role of metropolitan areas in the nation’s economy and politics.  She has also spoken widely about urban issues, at The Aspen Ideas Festival, South by Southwest, the Code for America Summit, and Techonomy, and her essays have appeared in Newsweek, The New Republic, The Atlantic Monthly, and Next American City.  A former attorney, Jennifer has co-authored Supreme Court amicus briefs in cases that affirmed the constitutional powers of local governments and secured greater environmental protections, including the landmark case, Massachusetts v. EPA.  Jennifer has a J.D., magna cum laude, from Georgetown University Law Center, an MPhil from Oxford University, which she attended on a Rhodes Scholarship, and a B.A. from the University of Texas.

 

JUAN LOBATO (@juanlobato_es)
Juan Lobato is the Mayor of Soto del Real since 2015. He was member of the Madrid Regional Parliament, and the Economic, Finance and Budget Speaker of the Social-democratic group, PSOE (2015-2019). He was also member of the public debt commission and President of the justice commission in 2018. He has a degree in Law by the Autónoma University of Madrid and received a degree in administration and business management from the same university in 2008. He has participated in five political leadership programs organized by the Aspen Institute in Spain (2013-2019) and directed by Mr. Javier Solana, NATO’s ex-General Secretary and Senior Representative for Foreign Policy and Common Security of the European Union. He participated in the US International Visitor Leadership Program (IVLP) as part of the Spanish delegation during the last US presidential campaign. In 2018, he was selected by the Advanced Leadership Foundation as one of the leaders to participate in the first “Cumbre de Innovación Tecnológica y Economía Circular” with important panelists including several prize Nobel winners such as President Obama. He has also participated as a speaker and panelist in different think tanks about technology, economics, social security and leadership. In April 2010, Juan obtained a position as tax inspector for the Treasury Department. Nowadays, he is level 30, the highest position in the administration career.

 

Recommended articles:

– Bradley, Jennifer; Vogel, Dan. “After Amazon: How Cities Can Use Tech to Their Benefit”, US News, April 4, 2019.
https://www.usnews.com/news/cities/articles/2019-04-04/after-amazon-how-cities-can-use-technology-companies-to-their-advantage

– Florida, Richard. “The Urban Housing Crunch Costs the U.S. Economy About $1.6 Trillion a Year”, CityLab, May 18, 2015.
https://www.citylab.com/equity/2015/05/the-urban-housing-crunch-costs-the-us-economy-about-16-trillion-a-year/393515/

– Sorin, Josh; Rose, Katie. “The Future of U.S. Cities”, Center for Public Impact, April, 2019.
https://gallery.mailchimp.com/cb2e57cfbf9135e56ec8d6e2f/files/ecd4ddc6-afe9-4610-b36e-d0871ed660e2/CPI_Future_of_Cities.pdf?utm_source=Future+of+Cities+Handbook+Download&utm_campaign=0bd1551c38-AUTOMATION__FOC&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_15fc64dcb6-0bd1551c38-221042097

– Bradley, Jennifer. “Co-creation: A Map, Not a Destination”, The Aspen Institute, March 13, 2018.
https://www.aspeninstitute.org/blog-posts/co-creation-map-not-destination/

– Bradley, Jennifer. “The City Reinvented”, The Aspen Institute, December 1, 2017.
https://www.aspeninstitute.org/longform/aspen-ideas-winter-2017/the-city-reinvented/

– Bradley, Jennifer. “Who are Cities For?”, The Aspen Institute, October 27, 2015.
https://www.aspeninstitute.org/podcasts/who-are-cities-for/

Tech&Society: Jennifer Bradley

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26/05/2020

Aspen Institute España and Fundación Telefónica held the first session of the fourth edition of the Tech&Society Program on Tuesday May 26, 2020 with a debate by Dr. Victoria Nash, Deputy Director and Senior Policy Fellow at the Oxford Internet Institute (OII), on The future of the algorithmic child: connected cots and talking teddies. María Zabala, journalist, writer and speaker focused on Media Literacy and Digital Citizenship, interviewed Ms. Nash.

The objective of the program is to establish a space to reflect on the impact of technological developments on human relationships, politics, education, the economy and medicine.  Over the past two decades, debates about children and the Internet have largely focused on questions of online safety and appropriate content or conduct. But the rise of the Internet of Things has brought screenless ’smart’ devices into many areas of domestic life, changing the ways that we run our homes or interact with our families. At the same time, app-based services provide ever more specialised opportunities to track and measure even the most intimate aspects of our lives. In a context where many families now have access to smart toys, digital ‘baby-tech’ and ever-expanding arrays of digital parenting tools, this seminar asks what impact the data economy might be having on our fundamental expectations of childhood and parenting. 

 

Recommended Readings:

  1. ‘You can track everything’: the parents who digitise their babies’ lives (The Guardian)
  2. Children are being ‘datafied’ before we’ve understood the risks, report warns (Tech Crunch)
  3. Complementary Reading: Who knows what about me? A Children´s Commissioner report into the collection and sharing of children´s data (Children´s Commissioner)

Biographies

Dr. Victoria Nash is the Deputy Director and Senior Policy Fellow at the Oxford Internet Institute (OII). In the latter role, she is responsible for leading the department’s engagement in digital policy matters. Her research interests draw on her background as a political theorist, focusing on normative questions of Internet governance and regulation, with a particular focus on policies relating to children and young people.  Her most recent research project examined the concept of the ‘algorithmic child’ and the data risks posed to children by connected toys and the Internet of Things.  She holds several digital policy advisory roles, including membership of the UK Government’s multi-stakeholder UKCCIS Evidence Group, OfCom’s Making Sense of Media Advisory Panel and the Advisory Board of COADEC. She is frequently called on to give expert evidence in UK and EU policy consultations on broader issues such as platform governance.

 

María Zabala is a journalist, writer and speaker focused on Media Literacy and Digital Citizenship. She works with families, schools, students, teachers and both public & private institutions, developing digital education initiatives such as workshops, conferences and ongoing education projects. She is editing collaborator for several websites, hosts the annual DigCitSummitES event and runs iWomanish, a platform in which she shares practical resources and reliable information for parents and educators, being family & technology her primary advocating cause. Her goal and commitment is to promote a safe, creative, positive and responsible use of technology. 

5/06/2020

Aspen Institute España and Fundación Telefónica celebrated the second session of the fourth edition of the Tech&Society Program on Thursday June 4, 2020 with a debate by Sherry Turkle, Abby Rockefeller Mauzé Professor of Social Sciences and Technology at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) and founding director of the Institute of Technology and Self, on “Not Alone Together but Together Alone – the paradoxes of screen time today”.  Jordi Pérez Colomé,  Technology Correspondent at El País and alumni of the 2019 Tech&Society Program, interviewed Ms. Turkle.

 

Recommended Readings:

  1. Book excerpt: Alone Together
  2. Coronavirus Ended the Screen-Time Debate. Screens Won. 
  3. Intimacy in Isolation: How Technologies are Impacting Human Connection During the Pandemic – Aspen Ideas 
  4. Sherry Turkle: We are Having a Crisis of Empathy – Aspen Ideas Festival 
  5. The Robotic Moment: Who Do We Become When We Talk to Machines? 
  6. Sherry TurkleLean into Boredom – Aspen Ideas Podcast 

 

Biographies

Sherry Turkle 
Social scientist and licensed clinical psychologist, has been studying people’s relationships with technology since the early personal computer movement in the late 1970s. Abby Rockefeller Mauzé Professor of Social Sciences and Technology at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) and the founding director of the Institute of Technology and Self
.  Turkle is the author of five books and three edited collections, including four landmark studies on our relationship with digital culture: The Second Self, Life on the Screen, Alone Together, and most recently, Reclaiming Conversation: The Power of Talk in a Digital Age.  She is a licensed clinical pyschologist specializing in the relationship between people, screens, and simulation.  She is the editor of three books on the relationship between people and objects: Evocative Objects, Falling for Science, and the INnter HIstory of Devices.  In Simulation and its Discontents, Turkle explores the significance of working and playing in artificial worlds.  A recipient of the Guggenheim and Rockefeller Humanities Fellowship and the Harvard Centennial Medal, she is a featured media commentaror and a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences.

Jordi Pérez Colomé
Born in Barcelona in 1976. He has degrees in Journalism and Italian Philology and a masters degree in International Relations. In 1999, almost by chance, Jordi started his career in Beijing working for a Chinese government magazine in SpanishIt was a short and fun. Back in Barcelona he mostly combined two jobsdifferent positions in a cultural mag called El Ciervo and associate professor in four universities (UOC, UPF, UB and UIC). He taught writing.  His writing exprience comes from being a journalist and having studied Philology.  His book “Cómo escribir clar” (How to write clearly) was the basis of his courses.  In 2008, Jordi worked at an innovative digital newspaper in Barcelona, Factual (like Murdoch´s The Daily).  There Jordi started a blog called “Obamaworld,” which he went on to maintain by himself for five years.  As it is obvious by its name, it was about Obama and his foreign policy. Those were the amazing years of the Arab Spring. It was the first Spanish journalistic blog to successfully use crowdfunding as a way to cover travel and living expenses for reporting. Jordi wrote several books based on his work with Obamaworld. He received two awards: the 2013 Jose Manuel Porquet on digital journalism and iRedes in 2014. That same year, Yahoo asked him to write for them an Obamaworld-like blog. In 2015 he moved to Madrid to work for another new digital, El Español. He did there many longform pieces, quite uncommon in Spain. Three years ago El País hired him. There Jordi went from general assignment reporter to party politics to, mercifully, tech now. Jordi has wife and two kids.   

 

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